Gardening Under A Crabapple Tree

February 19, 2018
Long, long ago on a 100 acre farm two parents made room for a tiny gardening spot underneath a crabapple tree for their youngest daughter. Oh it was just the absolute loveliest of spots. In the dry Summer heat the shapely crabapple tree provided just the right amount of shade. In the Spring the prettiest pink buds blossomed; just as quickly as the delicate blossoms appeared, they faded and gave birth to eager little crabapples which tumbled about the garden spot. It was here the youngster learned about gardening, the cycle of life and dreamed.



This youngster was me.

Planting and growing defined me from an very early age and even though the seasons of life have taken me from one coastline to another, I have always worked the soil of all of those regions.

I was born to two farmers who loved to work the rich volcanic soil in Idaho. Mom and Dad passed that love of growing right on down to me. It was on this land that I dreamed of a flower farm of my own. I am still dreaming of this flower farm to this day. Along the way I have studied, experimented and learned much of the science of producing not only flowers but vegetables and goodness gracious I love it all so very much!



For you gardeners this post is for you.

If you have any tips to share please chime in. I have found that Farmers are inclusive and enjoy sharing their knowledge, expertise and experience of what has made their particular crop successful.


As a grower I find that it is all about the beauty, quality and yield. There is just something so incredibly satisfying about looking over a handsome crop. You see you own this crop, it becomes part of the person you are. You tend to it, think about it and watch over it just like you would a small child. Keeping the crop safe from disease, heat, cold...it's a tricky balance...




Writing this blog is a great way for me document and keep notes on gardening practices that work well for me and when they work well for me, well naturally I want to share them with you! Today I have put together a gardeners guide on how to transplant seedlings.

As a gardener you may have heard the term hardening off your seedlings. This is a process that is done over a 7-10 day period of time so that seedlings become accustomed to strong sunlight, cool nights and less-frequent watering.



I shared the first segment of this two part series a month ago which is the Beginners Guide to Gardening.

I will be continuing this series all throughout the year. Some other topics on gardening that I have planned will include choosing basic gardening tools, how to deal with "dead," soil. (Which we have in our region of Texas.) Growing Lavender and poppies. If there are any other gardening topics that you'd like me to share please let me know.



Gardening is such a satisfying hobby for me, is it for you?



Thank you for joining Sadie and I today and happy gardening!


Spring is on it's way!



Jemma@athomewithjemma
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Comments

  1. Oh dear heart, what a delight to see you are doing what YOU LOVE. We all have something that calls us every morning, day and night and for you, it's homesteading. For me, it's searching for the right light and shadow in both words and images. Isn't it wonderful to be engaged in these gifts God has given us? May the fruits of your hands grow into delightful gifts to share. Hugs to you AND to that darling Sadie Girl!

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  2. This is such great advice! You are a top notch gardener, for sure. I never start my seeds indoors because I tried in the past and just didn't have much luck. I didn't know the steps that you shared though...maybe I'll try again. :)

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  3. Sadie is just adorable. She is growing so fast. Each time you have her in a post you can see how big she is getting. I love that you have mastered starting your garden from seeds. It will be beautiful and you will see the fruits of your labor soon. There is something wonderful about putting your hands into the soil and seeing the seeds sprout and grow. Have a great week.
    Hugs,
    Kris

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  4. I am not a gardener. The season is short and I have always been terrible at it. That said, I do love to be in the garden, tending to the flowers, watering, deadheading. There is something so soothing about that. Perhaps one day, I will work on my skills, for now, I will enjoy your pretty garden posts, pin them for the future and water what my husband grows!! Cute pup!

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  5. I love your stories about your childhood, Jemma! I am not much of a gardener, but between you and Joanna Gaines, I might just be convinced to give it a try. Just watched Chip and Joanna build that beautiful garden "shed" last night, and now I'm pumped! Just have to get over this "winter crud" I seem to have caught from The Man...lol!

    Warm hugs,
    Carol

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  6. Oh, how wonderful that you had an interest in gardening even when you were a youngster. And you had two very patient and loving parents to teach you. How special that was to make a special spot for you under the Crabapple tree. Your garden looks like it's thriving beautifully, Jemma. My dad had a garden across the street from his house, and it was one of his greatest joys. He would come home with the most handsome veggies. I can't wait to see your Poppies, Jemma. The orange Poppy is California's state flower. : )

    Hello Sadie - are you helping out too?

    love, ~Sheri

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  7. Interesting, Jemma. I never heard the "hardening off" term for seedlings (which might explain a lot...) Your posts on this topic are really interesting -- I can tell you have a passion for it!

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  8. Love it! Forget green thumbs, you know we both have green hearts deep inside! 😊💚💚

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  9. You have so much fun gardening. Oh I wish I had more time to garden. What little we do, I love it so. My man has to remind me that we cannot plant everything! LOL! I am itching to get my hands in the soil. I am so afraid we are going to have yet another frost before spring though. It doesn't feel like it today. It's nice. But in Florida, that can change in the next hour. Happy Gardening dear Jemma. Hugs and blessings, Cindy

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  10. Jemma, You have a way with words that inspire. I loved hearing about your childhood exploits. Your pictures and advise are top notch. I only wish I had a sunny spot to grow zinnias. Last year I planted seeds in containers but didn't have luck with them at all. I want to give it another try this year but the sad truth is there is not enough sun. I have mostly shade. So I will enjoy your adventures and see enjoy your garden.

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  11. Your writing and stories inspire me every, single time I visit here! I love hearing about your childhood. Your parents sound like the sweetest people. You must miss them terribly. But, their legacy lives on in you, and their love for the land and growing beautiful things is flowing through you and blessing all of us, in the process! May God bless you to fulfill your dream of that one special garden! Sending love and hugs to you today. :)

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  12. I too grew up with gardening as a way of life. My mom had many kinds of flowers but irises were her favorites. Does Sadie dig? :) My boys can be very naughty and dig things up.

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  13. Jemma, this will be a good series. Even though I consider myself a fairly knowledgeable gardener, I know you will share tips that we ALL can use. I may not always comment, but I will always read the posts. Thank you!

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  14. Your passion for gardening is apparent, not only in your words but your fabulous results. No one who feels 'eh' about gardening could EVER produce veggies like you do. Goodness Jemma, you garden belongs on the cover of a magazine! I'm green with envy (pun intended).

    xxx

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  15. Such a beautiful post, Jemma. I read and reread The Secret Garden as a girl and have loved gardens all my life. They are the most magical of places.
    Amalia
    xo

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  16. Your garden looks so tall and green Jemma! A nice change from the snow and now mud we have here. You have certainly embraced the gardening experience, and you sound so very happy with all that it has given you. I've never felt much like a gardener myself, although I have a lot of plants. I tend to go the easy route with just flowers and mostly perennials ;) You've provided some good tips and I didn't realize the seedlings needed so much care ... something for me to consider now.

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  17. I wish I was a better gardener! I am still getting used to gardening here in South Texas, and I have a lot to learn!!

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  18. Wonderful garden! I also love to sow vegetables and flowers. It's exciting to watch them every day how they grow, bloom and give fruit. In Bulgaria there is still snow.

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  19. I can't wait until spring and finally warm enough to start planting here! I have such terrible cabin fever right now. Practically climbing the walls with all this cold, gloomy weather here in IL. Finally some sunshine and temps in the 50's for Mon and Tues at least, so I'm trying to hang in there a couple more days. ;-)

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  20. Good tips, Jemma! I love to garden and wish I could grow vegetables, but we have too many wild animals here that eat them all. The only successful gardening I have been able to do it growing herbs in flower pots. I'm able to move them around in my garden during the summer so they get the most sun.

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  21. […] of our granddaughters before I forget! I can’t believe that I even said that, but I am in the gardening mindset […]

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  22. […] glad to have you and hope that you will join us as we share our gardening dreams and joys with you. Gardening is tricky business, as you know, but when those first blooms of the season pop open or those tender […]

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