09 April 2013

Lavender Fields-A Spot Of Tea






Lavender...

What comes to mind?

Restful sleep?

Calmness?

Wonderful Scent?


I am always thrilled when the things in my garden grow well-but I am even happier when they also provide me with a product!  I think this wanting a return on my efforts comes from my farming roots.  Growing up on a agriculture farm just gets in your blood and it never ever leaves,  You can take the girl out of the farm, but never ever take the farm out of the girl!
So, when I saw that I had enough blossoms on my lavender...

I asked myself one question-

Tea?



Lavender Tea is calming and has many components which are beneficial:  flavonoids, tannins, coumarins, and essential oils.





Freshly cut lavender is delightful it has such a pungent and aromatic scent.  It has 
been used for centuries all over the world for food and for healing.


There are  more than 20 species of lavender today, three of the most commonly found varieties are true lavender, spike lavender and lavandin.

True lavender is what you picture in an English Garden with narrow leaves, barrel shaped flowers and short crooked stems.  

Spike Lavender has coarser leaves than True Lavender and it's scent favors more of eucalyptus aroma-it is less pricey than True Lavender.

Lavandin is recognized by it's longer stems, larger leaves and larger flowers that are pointed at the tip-also known as Dutch Lavender.  Scent is woody, spicy and camphor-Lavandin is not a substitute for True Lavender.

  Such an amazing plant-

It is used for athlete's foot, acne, disinfectant  healing burns and insect bites.



I have two plants in my flower beds.  After Winter's rest they have many dead stalks on them, so I just prune them back.  You can already see the new growth that is vibrant and lush.




Lavender holds the promise of helping upset tummies, colic, migraines,
ulcers, colds and coughs. 






Homemade Lavender Tea:

Harvest Blossoms-wash and let air dry for 3 days
After completely dry remove blossoms
Combine Lavender blossoms with black loose leaf tea leaves
Simply mix together in a equal ratio
Place in a tea-ball or infuser
Add Hot water
Steep 1 to 2 minutes



Enjoy this spot of tea with a little sugar or honey and cream- or it is perfect without any additions!


Cottage Garden Party Fishtail Cottage
Mosaic Monday  Little Red House
Madge The View From Right Here
Jann Have A Daily Cup Of Mrs. Olson
Patti  Ivy and Elephants
Samantha  Crafty Texas Girls





Jemma@athomewithjemma
Jemma@athomewithjemma

Jemma's home is a quiet spot nestled among the trees. You might find me writing, reading, or puttering in my Greenhouse, tweaking a recipe, crafting a wreath or loving on my grands. Always living with a grateful heart.

13 comments:

  1. I wondered what part of the plant was used for lavender tea. Thanks to What's It Wednesday, now I know! Thanks.

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  2. I think lavender is lovely! Never heard of it being used as a tea! Thanks for the info!
    hugs, Linda

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  3. The other day, I was pining for the lavender festival, held in July each year, near us. I enjoy lavender tea, as well. It reminds me of Earl Grey, just a bit. I had never thought about what benefits it might have. Thank you for the information.

    Have a lovely day, Jemma!

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  4. Another talent of yours - I had no idea you were raised on a farm. And thanks for all the information on lavender - it is associated in my mind with relaxation. I will have to give it a try. sandie

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  5. I loooove lavender. Such a wonderful, calm, restful smell.

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  6. I love lavender and all its wonderfully calming and healing properties. You know so much about it, the parts and many uses for it. Thanks so much for sharing such a wonderful and informative post.
    Hugs,
    Patti

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  7. There is nothing better, in my mind, than the scent of lavendar. I have never tried lavendar tea so thank you for sharing this with us. I just recently made lavendar cupcakes which were delightful and wouldn't this tea be just the perfect companion?

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  8. Hi Jemma,

    This is a wonderful post. We have lavender fields nearby and I always look forward to going for a visit. Dried lavender is the best and I like it in my laundry and on my my bed. I believe in the medicinal value of the tea and I've also had a lavender martini ~ at the farm;) So fun! Hope you are having a great week!

    xxleslie

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  9. Oh wonderful to grow your own lavender. A lot of people ask me if I like the scent or the color, since I named my blog Lavender Dreams. But I love both! I've never grown it though but I surround myself with the wonderful scent and my house is painted lavender. This is a lovely post!

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  10. love smelling lavender, sooo good =)

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  11. My absolute favorite scent in the whole world is lavender. Beautiful.

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  12. Jemma, I love Lavender! I have used it in my bath and made cookies but have never made tea. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe. I had three plants and two completely died out this year. At least one is doing well. Can't wait till it blooms! Love your pretty lavender teacup also. Thanks for spending time and sharing at SYC.
    hugs,
    Jann

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  13. Anyone who loves lavender must be someone with whom I would enjoy being friends,,,blogging friends for sure...so, I am now following and invite you to visit over at my place anytime.

    I have two or three lavender plants just beginning to bloom now. For north Texas, this is great to have a lavender plant return from last year. I thoroughly enjoyed your post about lavender and love your little white bird.

    Judith

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